LYNN MARGULIS MICROCOSMOS PDF

Microcosmos tells the story of life on Earth from its origins down to the present, with a focus on what Stephen Jay Gould calls “the modal bacter”, on the central. MICROCOSMOS Four Billion Years of Evolution from Our Microbial Ancestors. Lynn Margulis and Dorion Sagan. Summit Books, New York, pp., illus. Microcosmos: Four Billion Years of Evolution from Our Microbial Ancestors. Lynn Margulis, Author Summit Books $ (p) ISBN

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I had to return it to the library. So I had mixed microcsmos about Microcosmos. Margulis writes like an asshat scientist. Rafael Suleiman rated it liked it Nov 18, While it should be read with a critical eye, however, and I would hesitate to recommend it to a complete newcomer to evolutionary biology, it is nevertheless most enjoyable and informative.

Not only were they the only organisms on Earth for most of its history; they are the organisms in which virtually all major metabolic pathways evolved and they remain the crucial intermediates in biogeochemical cycles. Jan 19, M rated it really liked it. Margulis is kind of a crazy bitch, but this book reflects her better more sane?

Four Billion Years of Microbial Evolution 4. The authors leave microbes behind and outline the possible evolutionary history of plants, dinosaurs, and humans.

Nice book, but, unfortunately, some of it is a little out of date now. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Much, but not all, of this effort has been along the lines of self-education in the common sense of going to schools, reading lots of books, writing and talking about one’s studies. Want to Margullis saving…. That preface suggests that this was intended to counter ecological arrogance and to balance human-centric ways of looking at the world.

We are but an evolutionary pup, whose capacity even for pollution is dwarfed by that of Archean microorganisms. Keep in mind that it’s a little outdated, as it’s fairly old for a science book.

Bacteria consumed chemicals from the surrounding environment to produce energy that they used to maintain themselves and to reproduce. In some places, however, Microcosmos borders on outright mysticism, with a confusion of levels of understanding: Collectively, they constitute a coherent world view that stands in sharp contrast to conventional wisdom about our planet and its biota. Microcosmos tells the story of life on Earth from its origins down to the present, with a focus on what Stephen Jay Gould calls “the modal bacter”, on the central role played by bacteria and other microbes.

Although Microcosmos can be read with enjoyment as a slightly idiosyncratic chronicle of evolution, it is really a sustained argument in support of an alternative biology. Homo sapiens fares poorly in Microcosmos. For example, Margulis and Sagan note that “it may not be a coincidence that the first mammals.

I’m hot for microbes! Dec 22, Spacemummy rated it really liked it.

Only after the biochemistry problems were solved did multi-cellular life forms like plants and animals evolve. Oct 24, Jenny Wehinger rated it it was amazing. Read many years ago as part of my study and practice of Continuum.

Microcosmos by Lynn Margulis, Dorion Sagan – Paperback – University of California Press

Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account. Effects of the Origin and Evolution of Life on Planet Earth – books about evolution – more microbiology – more popular science – books published by University of California Press.

For example, the authors espouse the theory of Sonea and Panisset that genetic exchange among bacteria is so pervasive and complete that all prokaryotes constitute “a unique, complex type of clone, composed of highly differentiated specialized cells”-in other words, a superorganism.

September External links: Her projections for the future were less interesting. Mar 30, Morgan rated it it was amazing. Jun 16, Kate marked it as to-read Shelves: I could only conclude that after we have destroyed our environment, and ourselves and our fellow creatures along with it, this microbial planet will recover rather quickly in It was comforting for me to realize after reading this ’80s classic that micro-biotic life is smarter than we are.

Return to Book Page. I could only conclude that after we have destroyed our environment, and ourselves and our fellow creatures along with it, this microbial planet will recover rather quickly in geologic time and the symphony will flow on at a different octave.

The World According to Margulis

Lists with This Book. Ortiz rated it it was amazing. Life at Small Scale on my desk, which is much more specific in scientific terms.

Muhamd rated it it was amazing Sep 11, Refresh and try again. John Forman rated it really liked it May 26, I might not recommend it for the casual reader but I really liked it.

My own study of biology ended in high school, except for the occasional book on the subject. At some points the arguments seem to get a bit too far, a bit too speculative, but you are always warned about that and, also, it helps pushing the boundaries of your mind frame set.

I love the concepts of cooperation and non-competition in the grand scheme of evolution. Good source for the story of microbial evolution and the path to animals etc but the far too long philosophical and speculative section later in the book really detracts from the whole.

Addressed to general readers, the book provides a beautifully written view of evolution as a process based on interdependency and the interconnectedness of all life on the planet.

The final chapter speculates on how humans might evolve as they colonize other planets and space environments.